Our Role is Cast

Every expression is the result of the interplay between light and dark.

Light is the simplest, purest and most integrated being that we know, confronting it is the darkness.

Light and dark resist the expression of their opposite, as they are polarities relative to one another; north and south poles, yin and yang, positive and negative (absent judgement) they counterbalance one another.

This resistance results in a spectrum of abstractions, or colors, that are made manifest through the lenses of the entities who perceives the light/dark interplay.

Both our common shared human nature, and our individual specific expression, influence the spectrum of colors that we percieve and add to the complexity of our perception and our consequent interpretation of our experiences of the interplay between dark and light.

The breadth of the spectrum (what we can see), is a function of the clarity and the accuracy of the prismatic lenses through which we each channel the interplay of light and dark.

As a result of our specific experiences, relative to our own interpretation of how acceptable we believe we express compared to others, our percieved role in life is cast for us.

We retain our own power to consciously and accurately intend our focus, (to correctly choose), in those areas of our life where we allow the interplay of dark and light to express without willfully interfering with it.

In those areas where we have attained a certain level of clarity, we can discern truth through the purety and beauty of the innocent interplay we are shown between dark and light.

The energy that we internalize, as a result of allowing dark and light to interact with little restriction, inspires, or energizes us to expand our awareness and to seek out more truth through the ever increasing manifestations of beauty that is revealed to us. 

Trying on our Role

Once our role is cast, we set about trying to play it as best we can, as we hope and believe this is the correct vehicle for procuring the meaning, validation and needs that we value as defined by our role, relative to the environment we find ourselves in.

We our often unsure or insecure about playing our first role, as our expression is only roughly defined, and it is new to us to play such a specific and restrictive role.  We resist initially, but we come to practice our new role enough, and we eventually come to accept our ability well enough to accept the expressions of others as being valid within a relatively narrow spectrum of other expressions.

The most disparate acceptable role that one can accept as valid, is its’ polar opposite or the darkest (or brightest) counter expression that relative ones own, one can agree to interact with. 

One feels comfortable enough to expend the energy to interact with their polar opposite, when they must, as they need their counter expression in order to validate their own expression as being acceptable, and also to use it as an example of what colors they are not fully aware of, so that they may expand their spectrum of visible colors, and grow as a result of that expansion, when they are confident enough in their own role to invest their energy towards that end.

During the interactions of polar opposites, the extreme expressions playfully banter back and forth, testing the strength of their own expression at playing their role relative to that that of their opposite. This can be seen as an exchange of minor insults or sarcasms, but it is really a friendly interaction, intended to explore the others conviction of their role, eventually culminating in either the expansion of the expressions of ones own role, or the solidification and the validation of ones role.

A PowerPlay ensues during these engaged interactions, usually one on one, where the polar expressions will offer up snide well-reasoned quips intended to provoke the other. This is a playful event, intended to feel out the range of the others acceptance of the two polarities, and continues as long as the others responses are acceptable to each. 

If either polar expression eclipses the acceptable range that the other finds acceptable, the other will disengage, or expand their own spectrum depending on the depth of the emotion applied in the one who feels the barb or realization sufficiently enough to grow or contract.

The net effect of this interaction is either an expansion (a growth of ones viewable spectrum) or a contraction (a narrowing view of ones spectrum).

Shrinking Creative Genius

Goethe was one of the most creative writers, productive scientists, and effective statesmen that ever lived. From a scientific perspective, several distinctive depressive episodes can be diagnosed in Goethe’s life. 

They were characterized by;

*extended depressive moods

*lack of drive

*loss of interest and self-esteem combined with social retreat

*He lost hope because no one took the time to understand him and he lost his inspiration, not because he didn’t adhere to the conventions of society, but because (like many creative types beofre and since) those very conventions were suffocating him.

Goethe displayed:

*diffuse and phobic anxieties

*dysthymia: (a persistent mild depression)

His self-therapeutic strategies were

*the systematic use of helping alliances

*behavioral techniques

*cognitive reflection on meanings and beliefs

*psychodynamic and psychoanalytic remembering

*repeating, and working through existential striving for self-actualization

*social commitment

*meaning

*creativity

*He was able to self-manage and self-actualize on his own as he had insights into the fundamental nature of humans, life, nature and consequently himself. The labeling of Goethe, or any other very creative type, is common by those who cannot see what he saw. Had Goethe acquiesced his spirit to the conventional wisdom of the 18th century, we may still be caught up in those very banal and meaningless conventions that he helped to expose.

Reference: Goethe’s Anxieties, Depressive Episodes and (Self-)Therapeutic Strategies: A Contribution to Method Integration in Psychotherapy, Journal of Psychopathology Vol. 46, No. 4, 2013

Heralds (Guides of human spirits and souls from birth to death) 

Represent the actualized ideal Authentic-Self who wants to connect with other Souls and actualize all of humanity.

  
Hermes: son of Zeus is the messenger between the gods and gods and men.
He is an intercessor between mortals and the divine, he is quick and cunning, he moves freely between the mortal and divine worlds (conscious and unconscious), and he outwits both the gods and man for the sake of mankind, and guides souls from birth and forward into the afterlife.

The Greek gods represent our unbridled passion or emotions, Hermes is the interpreter of these gods, or our guide in life. 

Through his interventions with man he attempts to inspire us to employ our intution and intellect to rightly interpret the guidance that our emotions provide us. His trickster nature engages our intellect and spirit through humor and irony, and ultimately provides us insight and wisdom through our intuition.

He is the Inventor of Language and Speech, a liar, a thief, and a trickster. 

Language helps us to communicate meaning, but only when we correctly interpret our emotions and our attached intuited insights in an honest and artful way, never through reason which keeps us bound to the ground, Hermes flys.

He is the protector and patron of herdsmen, thieves, oratory and wit, literature and poetry, athletics and sports, invention and trade, roads, boundaries and travellers. 

He inspires man through mans many endeavors, insuring that the full range of experience (what we consider good and bad, joyful and painful) is present for us to learn and grow from. He guides us through the boundaries that limit us and then through the transitions that take us higher to our expression of life.
  

One of his symbols is the Herma 

Initially a pile of stones placed at boundaries of lands where sojourners pay homage to by placing a stone onto or anointing it with oil.

His main symbol is the Greek kerykeion which consists of two snakes wrapped around a winged staff.
  
The snakes represent him intervening between the histrionic emotions of the unfocused gods (unrestrained emotions and passions) and the fearful animalistic nature of egoistic man, in a wise but trickster-like way. The snakes in a helix, envelop a Kerukeion, or a heralds staff. The winged staff is endowed with the full realized potential of the Self and all of humanity.
  

The helix, is the perfect symbol for the human experience. Like the shape of the very DNA that codes for our physical expression, the helix when viewed from one vantage appears as a circle, but when viewed from the right angle is a helix moving around a center but always moving higher and higher.

  

Iris is the young female representation of a herald like Hermes, as she too links the Gods with humanity. She also caries a Kerukeion and is represented by the rainbow with wings on her shoulders. She is associated with communication, messages and new endeavors. 
  

Human Heralds: (Prophets)

Those few of us who correctly intuit the messenges lying all around us, through our art can too leave clues that inspire and elevate humanity. Goethe, was the quintessential example in modern times, as through his insights, wisdom and artistic prowess, he provided clues for the endeavors of the the intuitive artists who could interpret what he left for them. 

Why I Weep

“For neither bumps or bruises, nor losses or failures do I cast a heartfelt sigh, 

Only for death, not of body, but the spirit, once so strong in my brothers eye.”

-Gump

Common or Uncommon Sense?

Common-Sense is cultivated when individuals focus their attention upon acquiring their fundamental human need for meaning by becoming skilled at understanding universally agreed upon or shared-meanings.  

Shared-meanings are constructed by people in their everyday interactions with one other, and become a convenient resource to interpret the meaning of elements of social and cultural life.
When people share a common-sense, then they share a definition of a commonly accepted reality.

As has been stated by many in the study of interpersonal communications, every problem of interpretation is a problem of understanding, and thus a commonly shared social reality affords groups of individuals an expedient way of communicating with one another.

Because we all have our own separate subjective internal world and version of reality, communication between two or more individuals can become strained and misunderstandings frequent when definitions and meanings are too loosely constructed.

Intersubjectivity represents the psychological relation between two or more people, and the act of communicating is the sharing of subjective states between individuals. Because we all have different internal realities, no matter how much effort one may apply into assuming a common reality, divergences (partially shared meanings) in meaning do tend to give rise to misunderstandings between individuals and groups.

Some examples of partially shared meanings include; when an individual displays a sense of self, either authentic or false, when an individual lies, when an individual displays aberrant emotions socially and when one plays a practical joke.

Lying occurs when an individual is aware of two definitions of a situation or reality, and chooses to act upon the reality that best serves themself, denying the existence or validity of other realities. When the liar does not emotionally compensate the other for their breach, extreme internal psychic imbalances can manifest, in both the liar and the one who was lied to. Depending on the emotional significance of the breach in trust, in either the liar or the one who was deceived, an individuals internal reality can become severely disrupted.

In individuals who commonly employ lying in the course of their everyday social interactions, their internally reality is most often adapted towards that of the culture they are a part of. For those who rarely lie, the experience of being lied to can be very discordant to their sensibilities and provoke either the need to assimilate the experience truthfully or cause them to comform their reality in favor of the common reality of their group.

A shared cognition and consensus is essential in shaping our ideas and relations, when acting in social situations. Similarly, language is a resolutely communal abstraction, not a private one as its fundamental purpose is to communicate with other individuals.

Love is perhaps the best example of intersubjectivity, as it implies a shared feeling of care and affection between individuals.

In the study of Intersubjective Systems Theory (IST), intersubjectivity is viewed as the process of “psychological energy” moving between two or more subjects. IST is defined as the constitution of psychological systems, or fields, in the interplay of differently organized experiential worlds. Emotional experiences always take the form within Intersubjective systems.

Enter the Romantics

18th century Romanticism bequeathed us with a depth of viewing human nature and behavior that had never truly been conceived of before. Goethe, through his intuitive processes, combined art and science, physics and metaphysics, and dark and light, to reveal to us through his allegories, insights into the human psyche and soul that opened the hearts and minds of so many.

Though not specifically, nor even theoretically, he found his voice through plays, poems and prose, to guide those with eyes to see and ears to hear to places they were meant to wander. He did this very deliberately, by remaining free of any specific dogma or ideology, though so many have always been so determined to pin him with one label or another.

Through Faust, and his other works, Freud, Jung, Carus and others were able to begin to discern the existence a deeper and largely inaccessible part of the human soul, the unconscious.  

Before this was understood, the masses did not view themselves so much as individuals with interiors that could be organized and enhanced to ever fuller expressions. The idea of an unique interior subjective existence of the individual was foreign to humans, as was the concept of the self-improvement that resulted from aligning the hidden world with ones conscious realms.

Goethe himself exemplified the possibility of the realization of living to ones full potential, as his life itself and not so much his individual achievements or failures, were literally living proof of the profundity of his thoughts. The interplay of light and dark, like the balance of the expanding and contracting forces we humans must contend with, were brought into an inspiring balance that resulted in a focused intellectual and influential powerhouse.

I suppose a modicum of common-sense is a necessary condition for a peaceful society to function, but what truly elevates and draws me forward is not the idea of the ordinary, but the ideal of the extraordinary!

The Effects of Lying

Lying occurs when an individual is aware of two definitions of a situation or reality, and chooses to act upon the reality that best serves themself, denying the existence or validity of other realities. When the liar does not emotionally compensate the other for their breach, extreme internal psychic imbalances can manifest, in both the liar and the one who was lied to. Depending on the emotional significance of the breach in trust, in either the liar or the one who was deceived, an individuals internal reality can become severely disrupted.

In individuals who commonly employ lying in the course of their everyday social interactions, their internal reality has most often already adapted towards that of the culture they are a part of. For those who rarely lie, the experience of being lied to can be very discordant to their sensibilities and provoke either the need to psychically assimilate the experience truthfully or cause them to comform their reality in favor of the common reality of their group.