Striving

August 12th, 1994

It’s a hot summer day and I’m sporting the requisite “cat eye” sunburn, thanks to my blue Vaurnet’s, after golfing in the early afternoon with some of my fellow redneck buddies. I’m standing in front of a bunch of people now, getting married, after having just feverishly completed 2 professional degrees in 9 years. My plan was coming to fruition perfectly, as it continued to do for the next few years. I’d planned on having kids by age 30, I was 30 and 2 months when the most wonderfully brilliant creature imaginable would be gifted to me, as my daughter Haelie (6lbs 12.7oz.), joined me on March 7th, 1997 at 12:30 in the afternoon.

The previous decade was a blur, but I do remember it with an uncanny clarity, though sometimes I wish I could forget a few things. School, work, work and school, that’s what it takes to be somebody in this world! I’d figured out how to succeed in my studies, rewrite my notes after class and study the night before the test, usually whilst watching TV or bull shitting with my buddies while sipping down a few “silver bullets”. I didn’t really care what I learned or what I studied (though I did get a buzz from studying the most difficult subjects and setting curves). I was a dyed in the wool pragmatist, for me the prize was waiting for me at the end of my strivings. 

For the next two years I would continue to work 7days a week, 10 hour days on weekends at a hospital pharmacy and 5 days a week “drilling, filling and billing”. So industrious I was, though I knew nothing about the true inner workings of myself. I began to miss filling my noggin with information, so I began reading “non-mandatory” books, as I had no more assigned reading or classes that I was required to attend. 

I started reading self-help books, “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People”, seems to be my starting point as I honed my razor sharp persona and materialistic mindset. Having consumed countless self-help books I began to run out of reading material, so I broadened my horizons and read “The Road Less Traveled”, by M. Scott Peck. From the first page, I was truly engaged in learning for the first time in a long time, I began to wake up a bit, although it would take many years for the fog to clear from the many gigabytes of information I’d crammed into my jumbled up noggin.

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